typette:

tetsuoatehimbread:

*draws*
wow i cant draw
*keeps drawing*

image

proper fucking attitude.

(via dogslug)

imgfave:

Posted by WALLQ

imgfave:

Posted by WALLQ

(via dogslug)

nikaalexandra:

beam-meup-doctor-precious:

xusedtoberussianx:

aspecialprovidence:

{That bitch made me so mad… I swear… It’s not that hard to be polite to someone, even if you’re not interested in them on a romantic level. UGgggg you guys have no idea how passionate I am about that.

I’D TAKE SOME POPCORN FROM YOU LITTLE STEVE

#this #sit the fuck down I’m about to give you some frickity fracking life advice #don’t be a cunt. # you never know who’ s gonna turn into a star-spangled sex god. 

At first glance I thought it was a deck of cards and I was really confused

i find this commentary really interesting….because the same argument made in defense of the “bitch” would be that some guy that she doesn’t know is reaching into her personal space? without any real precursor or provocation? (i haven’t seen the first cap movie so forgive me if that assumption is incorrect and disregard this if she did in fact ask for someone to share with her ) but isn’t everyone up in arms about how women don’t owe men shit, they don’t owe them to be polite or give them smiles etc if they don’t want to because they’re their own human being… so i find it really interesting that y’all drop that argument and start calling women who aren’t peachy keen towards your favorite male character ‘bitches’ and ‘cunts’

…..just some food for thought…..

^^ that. 

(Source: nataliaromanov)

eddievhfan1984:

straggletag:

dynamicafrica:

What you need to know about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The Ebola virus has been detected in several West African countries. Here’s what you need to know about Ebola and what’s going on (so far):

The back story on this particular outbreak of Ebola in West Africa:

It began early this year in the forested villages of southeast Guinea.

For months, the infected went undiagnosed. It wasn’t until March 23 that the news finally hit the World Health Organization. And by then, Ebola had already claimed 29 lives, the organization reported in a one-paragraph press release.

Since then, the organization has dispatched nine additional updates on a ballooning outbreak that’s received modest notice in the West, but has sent waves of panic across the African continent.

What exactly is Ebola?

Ebola is one of the deadliest virus diseases in humans. Known formally as the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) or Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever (EHF), it is caused by any one of the five known Ebola virus species:

  • Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV)
  • Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV)
  • Reston ebolavirus (RESTV)
  • Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV)
  • Taï Forest ebolavirus (TAFV).

What’s the history of this virus?

Ebola first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, in Nzara, Sudan, and in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter was in a village situated near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.

Here’s another infographic about Ebola’s history.

How does one get Ebola?

The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus. Consumption of a contaminated animal, close contact with an infected animal or it’s blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids can also lead to infection.

Once a human being is infected and comes in to contact with others, the disease continues to spread.

EVD outbreaks occur primarily in remote villages in Central and West Africa, near tropical rainforests.

What happens when you get Ebola?

EVD is a severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding. Laboratory findings include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes.

People are infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus. Ebola virus was isolated from semen 61 days after onset of illness in a man who was infected in a laboratory.

The incubation period, that is, the time interval from infection with the virus to onset of symptoms, is 2 to 21 days.

Which countries has the outbreak occurred in?

Guinea and Liberia have both confirmed multiple cases of Ebola. Ghannareported tests on a suspected case were negative. The WHO says Sierra Leone has ruled out Ebola in its two suspected cases, and two of Mali’s six suspected cases have been cleared. Nigeria’s Minister of Information confirmed there was no outbreak of Ebola earlier this month.

How many people have died so far in this particular outbreak?

As of April 8th, 2014, 98 people in Guinea and 10 in Liberia have all been confirmed dead as a result of Ebola.

Is there a cure for Ebola?

EVD outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%. So far, there is no specific treatment or vaccine is available for use in people or animals.

What about treatment?

No specific treatment is available. New drug therapies are being evaluated. No vaccine for EVD is available. Several vaccines are being tested, but none are available for clinical use.

Connect with Dynamic Africa on:

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

ETA: I’m not a medical doctor or health practitioner so feel free to rectify anything you see here that’s incorrect.

(top image via usatoday)

If you don’t think Ebola and Filoviridea in general are the tits, you’re wrong. They are crazy awesome, and terrifying. However! The mortality rate of 90% is really only for the Ebola Zaire strain…

In my opinion, as far as Filoviridea go, ebola is shit because it kills it’s host too quickly to spread properly, which means it fails in it’s purpose, to exist. It also kills it’s hosts rather than just living with them, which means it eventually dies. 

I mean, I am not talking about the horrors of it here, so much as my obsession with viruses… o,o;; The are rad. 

Though since a virus is more of a biological robot than a living organism, is survival really a life goal for these things? lol

The whole point of any living organism is to proliferate- and if you kill your host too quickly to pass on to a new host, then you’re failing. But living is also one of the main desires of living organisms. =p So yes- yes it is a goal. 

petrak:

adamsforthought:

dungeonsandpendragons:

commonly confused medieval weapons

a powerpoint by me

now stop screwing them up seriously or i will put a medieval weapon in your head

Tumblr is endearing me to being lectured at in Comic Sans

I didn’t know that spiked gauntlets were an actual thing. Shit that’s badarse.

Having played DnD for eveerrrr makes me so smug and informed about all of these. =p

dynamicafrica:

What you need to know about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The Ebola virus has been detected in several West African countries. Here’s what you need to know about Ebola and what’s going on (so far):

The back story on this particular outbreak of Ebola in West Africa:

It began early this year in the forested villages of southeast Guinea.

For months, the infected went undiagnosed. It wasn’t until March 23 that the news finally hit the World Health Organization. And by then, Ebola had already claimed 29 lives, the organization reported in a one-paragraph press release.

Since then, the organization has dispatched nine additional updates on a ballooning outbreak that’s received modest notice in the West, but has sent waves of panic across the African continent.

What exactly is Ebola?

Ebola is one of the deadliest virus diseases in humans. Known formally as the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) or Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever (EHF), it is caused by any one of the five known Ebola virus species:

  • Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV)
  • Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV)
  • Reston ebolavirus (RESTV)
  • Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV)
  • Taï Forest ebolavirus (TAFV).

What’s the history of this virus?

Ebola first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, in Nzara, Sudan, and in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter was in a village situated near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.

Here’s another infographic about Ebola’s history.

How does one get Ebola?

The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus. Consumption of a contaminated animal, close contact with an infected animal or it’s blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids can also lead to infection.

Once a human being is infected and comes in to contact with others, the disease continues to spread.

EVD outbreaks occur primarily in remote villages in Central and West Africa, near tropical rainforests.

What happens when you get Ebola?

EVD is a severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding. Laboratory findings include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes.

People are infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus. Ebola virus was isolated from semen 61 days after onset of illness in a man who was infected in a laboratory.

The incubation period, that is, the time interval from infection with the virus to onset of symptoms, is 2 to 21 days.

Which countries has the outbreak occurred in?

Guinea and Liberia have both confirmed multiple cases of Ebola. Ghannareported tests on a suspected case were negative. The WHO says Sierra Leone has ruled out Ebola in its two suspected cases, and two of Mali’s six suspected cases have been cleared. Nigeria’s Minister of Information confirmed there was no outbreak of Ebola earlier this month.

How many people have died so far in this particular outbreak?

As of April 8th, 2014, 98 people in Guinea and 10 in Liberia have all been confirmed dead as a result of Ebola.

Is there a cure for Ebola?

EVD outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%. So far, there is no specific treatment or vaccine is available for use in people or animals.

What about treatment?

No specific treatment is available. New drug therapies are being evaluated. No vaccine for EVD is available. Several vaccines are being tested, but none are available for clinical use.

Connect with Dynamic Africa on:

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

ETA: I’m not a medical doctor or health practitioner so feel free to rectify anything you see here that’s incorrect.

(top image via usatoday)

If you don’t think Ebola and Filoviridea in general are the tits, you’re wrong. They are crazy awesome, and terrifying. However! The mortality rate of 90% is really only for the Ebola Zaire strain…

In my opinion, as far as Filoviridea go, ebola is shit because it kills it’s host too quickly to spread properly, which means it fails in it’s purpose, to exist. It also kills it’s hosts rather than just living with them, which means it eventually dies. 

I mean, I am not talking about the horrors of it here, so much as my obsession with viruses… o,o;; The are rad. 

(via puke-ahontas)

raspbeary:

monster girl requests from the stream! respectively a feathered snake, a dragon and a golem girl! thanks for coming everyone

ermagerd yiss

(via petrak)

davyjr:

23pairsofchromosomes:

Butterfly eggs on a raspberry plant
A micro-crack in steel
Household dust
Needle and thread
E.coli bacteria on lettuce

Beard hairs under a scanning electron microscope: cut with razor (left) and electric shaver (right)
A moth wing
Leaf of a Virginia spiderwort
Marijuana
Shark skin

wooooah

davyjr:

23pairsofchromosomes:

Butterfly eggs on a raspberry plantA micro-crack in steel

A micro-crack in steelHousehold dust

Household dustNeedle and thread

Needle and threadE.coli bacteria on lettuce

E.coli bacteria on lettuce

Beard hairs under a scanning electron microscope: cut with razor (left) and electric shaver (right)

Beard hairs under a scanning electron microscope: cut with razor (left) and electric shaver (right)A moth wing

A moth wingLeaf of a Virginia spiderwort

Leaf of a Virginia spiderwortMarijuana

Marijuanashark skin

Shark skin

wooooah

(via petrak)

BOOP

BOOP

(Source: strawberryfck, via puke-ahontas)

geekycrap:

pleatedjeans:

via

checkmate, nerds

geekycrap:

pleatedjeans:

via

checkmate, nerds

(via petrak)